How to Find a Responsible Dog Breeder

Written by 2SpeakDog. Posted in Articles

Republished from The Humane Society of the United States

How to Find a Responsible Dog Breeder

Note: The Humane Society of the United States encourages you to consider adoption from a shelter or rescue. If you choose to purchase a dog from a breeder, the following guidelines will help you make sure your dog comes from a responsible breeder instead of a puppy mill.

5 Helpful Holiday Hints to Safely Celebrate with Your Pups

Written by 2SpeakDog. Posted in Articles

By Kasey Herrera, Master Trainer and Behavior Specialist

5 Helpful Hints to Safely Celebrate with Your Pups

1. Pre-Planning

There is always pre-planning when we are getting ready to have a celebration at our home and it’s easy in all the excitement to overlook our furry family members. Any time there is going to be a change in the home (i.e. new people coming to your home to stay or many people coming over for a celebration) we need to up your pups structure a couple of weeks before this excitement begins. We all get a little lax with our pups after awhile of good behavior but now is the time to revisit the obedience training you learned in the past. This way your pups remember you are the host or hostess, not them!

Introducing Your Pup to New Sights & Sounds

Written by 2SpeakDog. Posted in Articles

By Kasey Herrera, Master Trainer and Behavior Specialist

Introducing Your Pup to New Sights & Sounds

“My pup has issues when we go out and about. She seems to be afraid of the strangest things and people”. Many dogs that seem perfectly fine at home can still have some underlying fear issues that aren’t apparent until we put them in new situations. This can simply be a developmental phase for puppies and can be worked on with exposure, socialization and calming. In adult dogs many people think that this issue is hopeless, and unfortunately, keep their pups at home. You certainly can get them through it.

 

The Importance of a Feeding Ritual

Written by 2SpeakDog. Posted in Articles

By Kasey Herrera, 2SpeakDog Training and Behavior Specialist

The Importance of a Feeding Ritual

My dog won’t eat his food!
My dog guards his food!
My dog is reactive to other dogs!
I think my dog is guarding me!

These are just a few things we hear when working with clients and typically my response is “Let’s talk about a feeding ritual”. I talk a lot about changing the dynamic in the home before we can change that dynamic outside of the home. We need to let your pup know that you have got “it” so he doesn’t have to do the work. I want to let your dog know that you will take care of everything. You can tell your dog you are in charge by gaining respect through trust, not obedience through fear. A feeding ritual can be a great start to that process.

The feeding ritual is an important exercise for all dogs and their humans. It trickles into everything else you do with your dog. You will practice many of the skills you will need to change the dynamic in your home such as gaining space and creating a calm state of mind for both you and you pup. It adds value to food for picky eaters and grazers yet helps calm dogs who are excited or who experience anxiety around food. It is the type of mental stimulation we should be engaging in with our dogs daily, while building a bond between you and your dog based on respect and trust.

Insecure or reactive dogs will mirror your calm and confidence around meal time and their pack members. This ritual removes the weight from their shoulders and allows them to just enjoy being a dog. The feeding ritual will help create a dog who is balanced and confident, and trusts you to handle whatever comes their way.

Holiday Safety Tips for Dogs

Written by 2SpeakDog. Posted in Articles

By Drs. Foster & Smith Educational Staff

We want the holidays to be a happy time for you and your pet, not a time for an emergency visit to your veterinarian. The food and decorations that make the holidays so much fun for us can be dangerous for your pet. We do not want this article to dampen your holiday spirits, but we do want you to be aware of the dangers and plan carefully to avoid these potential hazards.

Food - Related Items

Holiday foods we enjoy cooking and eating can be a problem for your pet.

Rich, fatty foods, like gravy or grease, can cause problems ranging from stomach upsets to pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas resulting in pain, vomiting, and dehydration. Dogs with this serious condition often require hospitalization for treatment.

Dogs & Babies - Fostering a Happy Pack

Written by 2SpeakDog. Posted in Articles

By Kasey R. Herrera, 2SpeakDog Training and Behavior Specialist

Concerned about how your dog will react to your impending arrival? In some cases, it certainly can be a concern. Balancing being a “fur parent” and “human parent” can get pretty tricky sometimes. If your dog displays rude behaviors, then establishing some new behaviors should be a priority before your baby arrives. By establishing routines and a basic level of respect, you too can Foster a Happy Pack.

The first step to fostering a happy pack is to understand what is unacceptable or rude behavior and then establish new behaviors to create balance. It is important to know how to create a balanced and peaceful environment first. This will make for a smooth transition when bringing a new baby into your home. A simple question to ask yourself to help identify unacceptable behavior would be “Is my dog’s behavior acceptable for a 3 year old or a 93 year old?” Here are a few things to ask yourself when answering this question:

- Does my dog jump on me when I come home from work?
- Does my dog beg at dinnertime or steal food from my plate if it’s unattended?
- Is my dog demanding my attention by pawing at me, barking excessively, or by putting his face in mine until I give him affection?
- Is my dog getting so overly excited when people come over that it’s just easier to put him out or in another room?
- Is my dog jumping on the furniture even after I have asked him repeatedly to get down?

These are simply rude and unacceptable behaviors that people tend to overlook. It may be tolerable for you now but not for a 3 year old or 93 year old and most importantly, not for your new baby.